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Pages: (7) [1] 2 3 ... Last » ( Go to first unread post )

 Modern Finds, What you dont expect to find in a field!
Sid
Posted: Dec 1 2006, 06:12 PM


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Hi everyone, I hope you are all well.
Thought I'd let you know about my latest find whilst metal detecting in the fields
behind my house in Branston.
I firstly recovered 9 live shells, still with cordite strands showing, and a few bullet ends, then I came across a piece of bakalite with some electrical contacts on it. Next I was inundated with pieces of very light alloy body shell. You
guessed it , WWII plane wreckage. The bullets are stamped GB and date from 1939 - 1941.
So far all I have found is record of 2 Lancasters crashing over Branston in 1943 but I dont think the dates are close enough, as far as I know bullets were in high demand and wouldn't have been unfired since 1939??

Has anyone else got any ideas/info on crashed planes near Branston?

Makes a bit of a change from finding items hundreds of years old. mellow.gif
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Alex
Posted: Dec 1 2006, 09:13 PM


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I'll see what I can find out Sid, after I've handed my work in and updated the website.

Interesting finds so far. biggrin.gif


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"When I die I'm going to leave my body to science fiction."
Steven Wright.

Washingborough Archaeology Group
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Matt
Posted: Dec 4 2006, 12:06 AM


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Hi Sid
Have you tried contacting the Lincolnshire Aircraft Recovery Group? As far as I know, they are based at East Kirkby and may be able to help with information on WWII crashes.

Matt


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All I ask is the chance to prove that money can't make me happy.
Spike Milligan.
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Sid
Posted: Dec 4 2006, 08:40 PM


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Hi Matt, Yeh, I tried East Kirkby a couple of times but couldnt get an answer, but today i've had a bit of a breakthrough. I found out someone I work with's brother is an Aeroplane crash fanatic (sounds a bit morbid doesn't it). He has his own records he's built up from research and he has 6 recorded WWII crashes over Branston. From the dates and locations I am pretty sure we have an accurate answer.

On the 7th September 1941 a Hampden 1 bomber took off from Waddington at 21.15. Its mission was to plant the mine on board in Kiel bay, Germany. The plane failed to climb and only two minutes later at 21.17 it crashed at Branston killing all 4 people on board. The mine they were carrying exploded on impact, presumably
blowing the plane into a million pieces which is why I found such a large spread.
Makes you think, doesn't it?

Bye the way, I'm sure you guys have walked these fields already as its recorded as "flint scatter" on the PAS, I have also found quite a few traces of worked flint. It's all taken on a blue/white patina, presumably from the Limestone acid in the soil? I have also found some interesting metal items, Roman grey ware, late med pottery and a Roman coin of Constantine. Will keep you informed of any interesting ID's once i've been in to see Adam Daubney this week.
Bye for now.
Sid

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Pauline
Posted: Dec 4 2006, 10:52 PM


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Hi Sid

When I was organising the field walks years ago the farmers would tell me all sorts of interesting stories. One told me about an WWII aircraft crash - it left quite a crater and so they demolished a nearby derelict building to help fill the hole it made. If Matt can remind me of the farmer's names I might be able to remember who told me about it.


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Sid
Posted: Dec 12 2006, 12:45 PM


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Hi all,
Latest find from the field with the Aircraft crash site is part of a Great Square headed Saxon brooch, often only associated with cemetry sites.

I'm well pleased as its very rare for me to find anything Saxon. Needless to say I shall be returning there shortly. Will send a pic to Alex to put on the Web site if he wants. Will keep you posted of any more developments. rolleyes.gif biggrin.gif

Sid
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Alex
Posted: Dec 12 2006, 01:38 PM


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Cool, nice find Sid. You're more than welcome to have the picture up on the website. I'm almost ready to start up loading the site and start the return to regular updates.


--------------------
"When I die I'm going to leave my body to science fiction."
Steven Wright.

Washingborough Archaeology Group
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Sid
Posted: Jan 11 2007, 12:50 PM


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Hi eveyone,
I've been back on the field looking for more Saxon finds but have so far failed.
However, I picked up a signal near the Aircraft crash site, when I dug it, I found a watch. The watch was inscribed and when I got home and cleaned it up I managed to read the inscrption.

A A Watt
from Salisbury staff
1940
123563 2280

This guy was the pilot in the Hempden 1! I'm now in the process of trying to trace any relatives to see if they want the watch. If not it will be buried back in the field.

He was only 26 yet the oldest member on board the plane. What a resposibility at such a young age. He was from 44 squadron and his parents were from Southern Rhodesia.
Apparently its very rare to find anything personalised.

I thought this might be of some interest .

Bye for now,

Sid


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Alex
Posted: Jan 11 2007, 05:54 PM


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Wow, what a find and a story to go with it.

It would be great if you could get the watch to his reletives, it would make a great bit for the Echo.


--------------------
"When I die I'm going to leave my body to science fiction."
Steven Wright.

Washingborough Archaeology Group
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Pauline
Posted: Jan 11 2007, 06:42 PM


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Wow, that gave me goosebumps! Alex is right, that is a great story for the echo - even for BBC local radio when you have found out a bit more.


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Sid
Posted: Jan 11 2007, 10:16 PM


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Hi all,
Yeh, I thought about the Echo, but I'm not sure about going puplic with it. Before
I know it someone will work out the location and the "Nighthawkers" will strike.
I dont want to jeopardise losing the sight. For now I'll just keep you all
informed of progress.
Alex, I'll mail you a picture if you can link it to this page??

Pauline, your right its spine tingling to have such detail and history.
The funny thing is, about a week before, I had this feeling or wondered (not sure which) if I would find anything personal. I have all 4 Sergants names, I wonder if I'll find anything else personal?? mellow.gif

As horrible as it sounds, the back of the watch has been pushed into the mechanism, the shrapnel/debris must have ripped through his body from underneath and torn him and the 3 other Sergants to bits. sad.gif

Keep you posted,
Sid
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Pauline
Posted: Jan 11 2007, 10:25 PM


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Yes, you are right Sid - unfortunately you will have to keep quiet. I have done a little research myself and also have all of the crews names and the mission they were on. As you know, they took off at 21.15 on the 7th or 8th of September 1941 - though, oddly, where they took off from and where they crashed seems lost from the records I looked at.


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Pauline
Posted: Jan 12 2007, 09:43 AM


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The mission was described as 'gardening'! ohmy.gif


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Steve
Posted: Jan 12 2007, 09:56 AM


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7th Sept was the first British raid on Berlin


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Eternity's a terrible thought. I mean, where's it all going to end?
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Steve
Posted: Jan 12 2007, 10:32 AM


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Have you noticed that this crew seem to be the only ones in 44 sqd. who have the base given as 'MSG'.


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Eternity's a terrible thought. I mean, where's it all going to end?
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