This skin was created by Cortez of the IF Skin Zone

zIFBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Fully Featured & Customizable Free Forums

Learn More · Sign-up for Free
Welcome to Gooddealgames. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Name:   Password:


 

 Optoma HD33 3D DLP Projector
Malakai
Posted: Feb 1 2012, 11:54 AM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



Finally, a 3D projector has been released in the lower price range that features 1080p native resolution and doesn't require a 3D converter box to operate, meaning the 3D emitter is included. Instead of using infrared, this projector uses RF, which usually means that the signal isn't lost when you turn your head or move out of the room or whatever.

At around $1,500, this probably is the 'best' buy for an 'out of the box' 3D projector system, but here's the catch: the 3D glasses are still expensive. Although there are generic versions of infrared glasses coming in at around $50-$60 now, the cheapest RF glasses I've been able to find have been around $89 per pair. For a family of 2-3, this may not be a huge problem, but we still have not reached a level where people can have parties/movie get togethers, sports events, etc in an affordable way.

Seriously, who wants to stock up on 10-30 pairs of active shutter glasses at $90 per pair when they may only use a couple pairs throughout most of the year? That's $980-$2700 extra bucks. With current DLP technology, our resolution is already halved during 3D content. Most, if not all, passive LCD 3DTVs also suffer the same fate.

With that being said, I believe passive 3D technology is the way to go. Not only is it better on the consumer's pocket book (no batteries, cheap glasses) it also doesn't suffer from the brightness/contrast consumption of active shutter technology. The only way to currently get true passive 3D projection in a home theater currently is to create a makeshift stereo projection (two projectors) system with special lenses, a highly-reflective screen, and a computer that syncs the images to the right projector system. It usually means using matched projectors and matched, new bulbs. Some people DO use this type of system, but that doesn't mean it's cheap or easy. Then again, the type of people who create these systems are DIYers and probably have a lot of spare parts around. That still doesn't make it 'easy'...

I believe passive 3D projection using a single DLP bulb will be the next step in home theater 3D projection technology. If they could just figure out how to get full 1080p resolution using only one bulb, more people may invest in the technology. Why doesn't DLP offer full resolution? Maybe DLP technology doesn't support a high enough refresh rate to actually do it... who knows?

So, what about the total costs of setting up a Optoma HD33 3D projector? At $1,500+, it does NOT include a single pair of 3D glasses. So, let's say $270 for 3 pairs of glasses, $175 for a mount, $90-$300 for a (cheap or ps3) blu-ray 3D player, whatever the cost for an HDMI cable, and of course, an electric projection screen, at $300-$600 for a 150". Replacement bulbs, probably $240+. Optional: extended warranty $180-$200... So around $3,000 or less, you can get a pretty fancy setup that all of the neighbors would be 'envious' of!

OR if that's too big, a Mitsubishi 3D DLP tv, at 73" cost around $900-$1000, plus the 3D kit $250-$300 (includes 2 pair glasses, converter box, emitter)... seems like a cheaper alternative, but the bulbs in this tv are only rated to last appx 6 months. I've seen replacement bulbs for as cheap as $58 for these, however.

I actually have a 60" mitsubishi 3Dtv, from when they actually cost a lot more in the stores, including like $440+ for the 3D kit! The TV is good and clear, and there is practically zero ghosting on 3D content, but you don't get the pop out effect from other tvs and sometimes probably not quite as much depth... If you can deal with that, it's still a good (but sometimes buggy) tv. They actually have a 93" version out now!

With that being said, nothing is going to be like a 150" or larger screen like a projection system will offer!


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Malakai
Posted: Feb 2 2012, 06:35 PM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



I just found out about another product that actually converts active 3D from a projector's lens and converts it to passive. The catch? It's still pretty expensive, at $1,499. Apparently true passive 3D projectors start at around $10,000 and go upwards of $20k+. Is it worth the costs? If you have $2,000-$3,000 in your current setup and you have a choice to either buy active glasses at $70-$90 per pair or pay a one-time fee of $1,500 and get free and cheap passive glasses, some figurin' has to be done! For $1,500, you should be able to buy 20 pairs of active glasses and still have $100 left to buy replacement batteries for a long period of time. Passive glasses are lighter and more comfortable, but for most people, the costs can't be justified.

http://hdguru.com/tru3d-active-to-passive-...on-review/5926/


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Steve
Posted: Feb 12 2012, 09:03 PM


Administrator
*

Group: Admin
Posts: 503
Member No.: 1
Joined: 21-April 06



I used to have a dlp projector that lasted 2000 hours, but the bulbs are so expensive I didnt replace it. I am still looking for a cheaper projector but not those 50 dollar gamer ones that are horrible. Any suggestions?


--------------------
QUOTE
Chance favors the prepared mind
Top
Malakai
Posted: Feb 13 2012, 10:26 AM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



The bulbs for the Optoma HD33, you can buy the bulbs for around $158 on-line. My estimate of $240 would be at the retail level. For the optoma HD66, the bulbs can be bought for $120-$138. If they last anywhere near their 4000 hour rating, then they would be well worth it. I think the day and age of $500-$600 projector bulbs is coming to an end.

I remember my uncle having a (infocus?) projector and having to replace the (supposedly brand new) bulbs at around 200 hours, and he paid $500 apiece for those things locally. After the second one blew, he gave up. The reason I'm mentioning this is because there's no guarantee on any bulbs you buy, even if they are rated for 2,000 or 4,000 hours. There's probably a big chance that his actual projector had something wrong with it, maybe giving the lamps improper voltage or shorting them out, but who knows? This was probably less than three years ago, on an XGA 4:3 native set, and there's no way I would have even bought a replacement bulb at all for one.

My toshiba dlp tv (720p, not 3D) actually uses a projector bulb in it, and although they're only rated for like six months, I've been using it almost constantly for several years without replacing the bulb. My mitsubishi 3DTV DLP tv also uses a projector bulb, but I've been a little more cautious not to use it unless I'm watching something. The replacement bulb for the mitsubishi, last time I checked, was around $100 on-line, and they are suppose to be easy to change out.

If you don't mind the 720p rating, the Optoma HD66 would be the way to go. Optoma seems to be a well-established company that many home theater enthusiasts seem to love, and this particular brand is 3D-compatible. The 3D-XL adapter/converter and glasses are sold separately, meaning you don't have to put down all of the money upfront. The projector new is around $500-$600, the 3D-XL adapter (which comes with 1 pair of glasses) is around $280-$290, and extra pairs of glasses can be bought for around $59 on ebay.

If you (want to) have large parties where 15 or 20 people or more come to see 3D films, you can setup a passive 3D system as talked about in my previous post. It has a lot higher setup cost (polarized screen, two matching projectors, two matching bulbs/lamps, 2 3D-XL adapters, a pair of polarized filters for the projectors), and the projectors have to be mounted at the perfect position, but after X amount of people/glasses which would have to be bought, it would be more cost efficient to go with passive vs active. The polarized glasses (not the same as RealD) are probably $1 to $2 per pair for the paper versions, a little more for the plastic. One of the problems with passive 3D is that there is more ghosting, especially noticeable in dark scenes. This is because the polarized filters can't block every bit of light from coming through on the left/right projectors.

The 3D-XL adapters just came down from like $350. So, I'm almost ready to just buy the Optoma HD66 setup myself. The 720p is a turnoff, especially when you considering that when using DLP and 3D at the same time, you're getting half the resolution, but most people say you can't even notice. After all, 720p halved would be 720i or 360p, if there were such a thing!

I think the key to any projector system is to only use it when you want the big screen effect, not just when watching the news or most tv channels, to preserve the lamp life. I imagine they use quite a bit of electricity too when always on.

Since I've started working on my addition (living room, home theater room) again, I've been planning for about a 180"-200" 16:9 screen in it. It'll either be pull down or electric, because as I've said, it won't be my primary tv.

-

Speaking of the addition, I know it's going to be way over budget. I planned for an $8,000 budget on the whole project, and so far, I'm over $6,000 in and will probably need another $4,000-$5,000 to finish. It's (mainly) not the big stuff that cost so much damn money. It's all of the little brackets, ties, clips, and accessories that don't seem like a lot of money in small quantities but cost a shiznitload in the end.

About the only decision I opted for, which I knew would cost more, was to go with a solar white reflective metal roof and instead of going from the trusses straight to purlins, I decided to go with 1/2" plywood, which acts as an insulator and allows me to put felt paper on it for added protection. The metal can go straight to the plywood, but I chose to 1x4 the top as well, for air ventilation and to give the roof a little more strength and weight.

Since we're in a hurricane/tornado zone, we had to use hurricane clips (about $25) and strong tie stud plates (single/double = $180) to make sure high winds don't lift the roof up. The strong-tie stud plates attach at both the top and bottom of the 2x4 studs. They have a single 2" section and connects to a 4" section. On the top, it connects the studs to the top of the frame and then the top plate. On bottom, it connects the stud to the bottom frame and to the floor joist frame. They nail or screw in horizontally to prevent vertical uplift. The theory of how they work is to make the force of the wind spread evenly throughout the building, all the way to the floor (and to the ground, if tie-downs are used)...

I think stud ties are somewhat a flawed concept. For one, you're most likely going to do 24" on-center spacing (sometimes 16") for the trusses, which means that there is less 'mechanical' hold (2x hurricane clips per truss) on the trusses themselves than on the studs (2x stud plates per stud, meaning 4x stud plates on front/back) themselves. On most cases, you'll only have about 1/4th or 1/3rd the mechanical strength at the roof (assuming you're using standard gable roof trusses) by the time you add the stud plates to the side walls.

With 16" on-center spacing, you match the truss connections at the top plate with the stud connections on the top plate but still only get half of the mechanical strength (remember, 2x h-clips VS 4x stud plates) and also lose the mechanical strength on the side studs/stud plates. Best case scenario = it saves your roof. Semi-worst case scenario is that your roof may blow off but you may save the rest of the building with minimal damage! I've seen some of the tornado damage in Texas during some of last years tornadoes, and a few had just their roofs torn off, whole. I remember seeing one roof that had been blown several blocks away, in another neighbors pasture. Of course, there are different types of h-clips, probably with varying strengths, but I'm not going to get into that, since I'm no expert.

Anyway, this roof has cost at least $3,000, maybe a little more. If I would have just had a lump sum of money, around $8,000-$9,000, I probably would have bought one of those double-wide schoolhouse buildings and used it as an addition. Sometimes, it is cheaper and easier to buy a used building than it is to build a new one!


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Malakai
Posted: Feb 18 2012, 11:57 AM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



I've got a little extra cash this month, before starting on the siding for my addition next month and ended up purchasing a 3D-XL 3D Converter/Adapter, for DLP 3D projectors. At $300 or less, it was just a little too tempting not to get one. It'll probably be several months before I can actually buy an actual projector, however.

As for the actual screen size, it's really hard to tell exactly how large it will be, because of throw distance, the size of the addition, ansi lumens of the projector, and the seating area/layout of the addition. Although I initially wanted a 180" 16:9 screen, I think that's a little unrealistic with the throw distance from the hd66 projector and its ANSI lumens.

A combination of distance, ansi lumens, screen gain, and ambient light (brightness from windows and other stuff) all play a factor in how bright the picture is.

Because I'm adding a storage closet near the outdoor entrance, which is going to take up about 6' of the building, that leaves us will a smaller area to mount the projector to the ceiling from. Also, the side entrance to the house takes up a wide area, where couches or chairs can't go, for seating layout. That also pushes the seating distance closer to the screen. Too close to a screen with too large of screen will make it impossible to see the whole screen. So, a lot of experimentation will have to happen, with throw distance before any permanent placement is decided.

The 3D-FX converter comes with 1 pair of 3D glasses, and in the upcoming months, I'll purchase a few extra pairs as I can afford them and a projector mount.

It does suck that it'll probably be at least a year before my addition is completed and the home theater system can be enjoyed, but it'll be worth it in the end!


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Malakai
Posted: Feb 19 2012, 01:28 PM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



Damn, I just got refunded for my 3D-FX adapter/converter purchase. I'm tired of dealing with paypal, am now just transferring the funds to my bank account and will buy the converter (for about $10 cheaper) from somewhere else after it's cleared. That's probably what I should have done in the first place!


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Malakai
Posted: Feb 25 2012, 03:12 PM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



Steve, if savings is ultimately what you want, Viewsonic makes some 3D projectors around the $460-$500 mark, at least $100 cheaper than the Optoma HD66. The catch? They are XGA native resolution. Even better news is that Viewsonic makes a 3D converter/adapter for those (and other dlp 3d) projectors at around the $200 mark. There is some reports that this converter (VP3D1) may include a mail-in voucher for PGD-250 ($100 value) 3D glasses, which is what viewsonic recommends. Even if it doesn't, that's still a little bit of savings from Optoma's 3D-XL adapter, closer to $290. Third-party DLP-Link 3D glasses can be bought for $59. That almost $30 savings is about half the cost of another pair of glasses.

Optoma HD66 Projector + 3D-XL = est $900

Viewsonic Projector + 1 pair glasses + 3D converter = est $730

The $59 3D glasses are reportedly bulkier and less comfortable than the $100 glasses, but as far as how they work, I don't think they function any differently from one another.

DLP-Link technology has no true way to sync glasses like IR and RF does. So, it can actually make the glasses blink in the wrong order, which can be changed from the projector's menu screen.


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Steve
Posted: Feb 26 2012, 06:00 PM


Administrator
*

Group: Admin
Posts: 503
Member No.: 1
Joined: 21-April 06



Thanks, I just bought an Epson s210 for around $360. It was cheap has good stats with usb support and it should last. I got real lucky with my old dlp that lasted forever.


--------------------
QUOTE
Chance favors the prepared mind
Top
Malakai
Posted: Feb 27 2012, 04:36 PM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



I went ahead and ordered a viewsonic 3D video processor, after comparing the differences between the two units, including the differences in 3D glasses in the Optoma system. The optoma includes a $69 pair of 3D glasses for $289 (currently) and the viewsonic most likely doesn't include any, for $199. Considering both units do (almost) the same thing, that's a $21 savings. Even better for people that can't save money worth a flip is that you don't have to buy the glasses with the adapter. Hopefully by summer time, when I stop doing my major outside work (and will have taken a break from working on the addition until the fall) I'll have a complete 3D projection setup!


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Malakai
Posted: Mar 6 2012, 08:38 AM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



Well, I'm starting to get the feeling that my Viewsonic 3D Video Adapter/Converter order is having some type of problem. I ordered the unit on feb 27th, and for the last week or so, the status on amazon has been 'shipping soon' Usually when it says that, it ships within the next 48 hours. What also strange is that the price went up from $199.99 to $282.56. I contacted the seller last night about the order and hopefully will hear from them soon. At $282.56, the 'value' factor really isn't there at all, since the Optoma 3D adapter is at the same price level and definitely includes a pair of 3D glasses.

If this order doesn't come through, then I guess it just wasn't meant to be. I could definitely put the money on my addition siding or even on a new heat pump.


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Malakai
Posted: Mar 7 2012, 08:42 AM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



Well, yesterday, the company emailed me and told me the shipment was getting ready to be sent out and that either that day or today, I'd get a shipping notice from amazon. I obviously didn't get a shipment notice yesterday and am waiting to see about today. I may give it until tomorrow morning before filing a refund claim.

Usually when a company waits this long to ship an item, they are back-ordered and are stalling for time.


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Malakai
Posted: Mar 8 2012, 07:15 AM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



I finally got a ship notice at the last minute. So, I guess I won't need to file for a refund after all. I was starting to think that something was trying to keep me from building a projection system :/


--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
Steve
Posted: Mar 20 2012, 09:16 PM


Administrator
*

Group: Admin
Posts: 503
Member No.: 1
Joined: 21-April 06



sounds like a hassle!


--------------------
QUOTE
Chance favors the prepared mind
Top
Malakai
Posted: Mar 22 2012, 06:03 AM


The Eclectic Gamer
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2,369
Member No.: 4
Joined: 20-June 06



I finally did receive the unit. It did not include any certificate for a pair of glasses. That must have been a previous promotion some people have talked about, not that I expected a free pair.

I suppose the worst news is that the warranty will be expired before I ever get a chance to test this unit out, because the money I'm putting on the addition is taking away from building that system currently.



--------------------
125 HD-DVDS, 176 BLU-RAYS, 214 3-D BLU-RAYS, 281 DVDs, 599 VHS, 28 VCDs, 5 PSP Movies, 176 Laserdiscs, 10 Field-Sequential 3D DVDs
Top
zIFBoards - Free Forum Hosting
Join the millions that use us for their forum communities. Create your own forum today.

Topic Options



Hosted for free by zIFBoards* (Terms of Use: Updated 2/10/2010) | Powered by Invision Power Board v1.3 Final © 2003 IPS, Inc.
Page creation time: 0.1361 seconds | Archive